jdmyprez (jdmyprez) wrote in civil_war_rebel,
jdmyprez
jdmyprez
civil_war_rebel

Random Useless Crap #4

When we are young, we are taught about the glory of words that is the infamous "Emancipation Proclamation". What most educators will not bother to tell you is that the document which is credited with freeing millions of slaves did in fact free next to nobody and was actually a ploy designed to keep the Nations of Europe from recognizing the Confederacy as a legitimate nation. The words of Lincoln himself are:

"That on the 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

"That the executive will on the 1st day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State or the people thereof shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such States shall have participated shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State and the people thereof are not then in rebellion against the United States."

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-In-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for supressing said rebellion, do, on this 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days from the first day above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States the following, to wit:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Palquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terrebone, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northhampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are for the present left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall be, free; and that the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all case when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages.

And I further declare and make known that such persons of suitable condition will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God."

What I find funny is that the majority of educators in this country continually eat up the Lincoln dogma and then pass it along to their students. Either they do not know better,see Lincoln as a near Deity, or do know but are so afraid of crossing the line of political correctness by insulting the "Great Emancipator" and being branded a racist. It is easy to see several things by a close examination of this document. First, you will see that Lincoln freed the slaves in areas that were deemed to be in rebellion. These areas were obvioulsy the States that made up the Confederacy. That order alone was meaningless because the Confederate States of America was not "in rebellion", they were a sovreign nation. They were not subject to the laws of a Nation to which they did not belong. This would be the modern equivalent of our Government passing a law forbidding the Canadian Government to display a Maple Leaf on its National banner. The second problem is that there were certain areas of the areas "in rebellion" which were specifically not subject to this order. When this order was penned, history will show, that all of the areas of the Confederacy that were NOT subject to this order were those areas that were either firmly in Union Control or had a large percentage of residents who considered themselves loyal to the Union. It is funny that the areas of the enemy nation that could have had this order enforced were not even subject to the order to begin with. The third major thing you see with this proclamation is that States and territories which belonged to the Union, yet allowed slavery as an institution, were not subject to this order. This included the States of Kentucky, West Virginia (which would be admitted illegally to the Union a year later), Maryland, Delaware, Missouri, and the District of Columbia (Washington D.C.). Did Lincoln just forget to include these areas? No! He could look out of the Oval Office window any day of the week at any hour of the day and see hundreds of slaves running errands up and down Pennsylvania Avenue. He not only did not mention them, as you can read, he blatantly excused them from following this order. The intention of this document, no matter what PC history books will tell you, was NOT to free slaves. It was simply set up to swing the public opinion of the United States back in his favor and to give the Nations of Europe a good reason to not diplomatically recognize the Confederacy. Prior to this proclamation, the general consensus of the civillians in the Union was that the war was not worth the cost and that the South had a right to go. Even though the vast majority of Unionists were not favorable to the welfare of the "Negro Race" they would never cast stones at an administration or denounce a war that now had a new purpose. Freedom was the single best word to use to gain favor from a country who had just won that very thing less than 100 years earlier. Nobody wanted to back out of a war when they now thought the purpose would be to free an oppressed population. The nations of Europe for the most part were very very close for many reasons to either recognizing or siding with the Confederacy. Lincoln, knowing this had to find a way to keep them from getting involved and so he played upon the unpopularity of the institution of slavery among the peoples of Europe. No nation would officially join with a Nation that was now perceived to be fighting a war of oppression. A siding with a power of this nature (even though most European Nations knew the true story) would have led to near revolution in their own nations due to the fact that slavery was universally condemned by all classes in this area of the world. No King or Queen would ever want to bring the stigma of slavery upon their reign. Some apologists may say that even though this proves that Lincoln never intended to free anyone and could care less about a race that just a few years earlier he had denounced, it still shows that he was a brilliant commander. That is true, but so was Hitler!
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